It is almost an oxymoron to represent the Internet as a physical construct. The Internet is invisible, intangible and dynamic. Architecture, on the other hand, is heavy and static. The Internet has barely pushed its boundaries beyond the screen to exist physically. 

Drawing from the narrative of Black Mirror’s episode of Be Right Back, the London Internet Museum creates a sensory datascape where people are able to have a bodied experience with data, in the form of water. Water, as an element, encompasses many sensory interpretations. 

The ground is converted into a sensory maze containing different pockets of ‘water spaces’. People wander around this maze, immersing themselves as they dip their feet into the pools, drink water from the fountain, and walk amongst the mist – unbeknownst to them that different aspects of Big Data are controlling the water. The gallery spaces are integrated into the maze, and are a part of this sensual journey. 

Moving along, one would enter the overlooking structure that contains the education facilities of the Internet Museum and a large viewing area, where one can look out to the maze. At the viewing area, real-time data that controls the water of the maze is being exhibited. Here, a different form of data immersion takes place in the form of learning, making and creating. 

Water – and its many states – pressures architecture to be more dynamic and allows it to move along with the ebb and flow of data. 

Submitted for the London Internet Museum Competition and was awarded the Honourable Mention prize.

It is almost an oxymoron to represent the Internet as a physical construct. The Internet is invisible, intangible and dynamic. Architecture, on the other hand, is heavy and static. The Internet has barely pushed its boundaries beyond the screen to exist physically. 

Drawing from the narrative of Black Mirror’s episode of Be Right Back, the London Internet Museum creates a sensory datascape where people are able to have a bodied experience with data, in the form of water. Water, as an element, encompasses many sensory interpretations. 

The ground is converted into a sensory maze containing different pockets of ‘water spaces’. People wander around this maze, immersing themselves as they dip their feet into the pools, drink water from the fountain, and walk amongst the mist – unbeknownst to them that different aspects of Big Data are controlling the water. The gallery spaces are integrated into the maze, and are a part of this sensual journey. 

Moving along, one would enter the overlooking structure that contains the education facilities of the Internet Museum and a large viewing area, where one can look out to the maze. At the viewing area, real-time data that controls the water of the maze is being exhibited. Here, a different form of data immersion takes place in the form of learning, making and creating. 

Water – and its many states – pressures architecture to be more dynamic and allows it to move along with the ebb and flow of data. 

Submitted for the London Internet Museum Competition and was awarded the Honourable Mention prize.