Íchni is a mixed-reality scenographic space exploring how a heightened awareness affects our movements. The performance space consists of a series of playable sculptures and a digital projection that makes visible the effects and propagations of the movements; creating an affective feedback loop between body, movement and space.

The metal sculptures are embedded with physical sensors that capture the forces of the movements. The design of each sculpture is based on rudimentary geometry that evokes playful use — e.g. the seesaw — thus inviting actions.

The word íchni (meaning ‘traces’) encapsulates the notion of movements and notational markings. Physical movements — usually so fleeting — are captured into data, then translated and visualised to heighten the awareness of our actions and affect the manner in which we move through a generative environment.

A self-orchestrated choreography emerges from the interaction between the physical and digital as the performer progressively finds complicities between the mechanics of the body, the sculptures and its environment. Íchni is thus conceived as the other performer — an improvised performance between the body and its negotiation with the environment.

Íchni is a mixed-reality scenographic space exploring how a heightened awareness affects our movements. The performance space consists of a series of playable sculptures and a digital projection that makes visible the effects and propagations of the movements; creating an affective feedback loop between body, movement and space.

The metal sculptures are embedded with physical sensors that capture the forces of the movements. The design of each sculpture is based on rudimentary geometry that evokes playful use — e.g. the seesaw — thus inviting actions.

The word íchni (meaning ‘traces’) encapsulates the notion of movements and notational markings. Physical movements — usually so fleeting — are captured into data, then translated and visualised to heighten the awareness of our actions and affect the manner in which we move through a generative environment.

A self-orchestrated choreography emerges from the interaction between the physical and digital as the performer progressively finds complicities between the mechanics of the body, the sculptures and its environment. Íchni is thus conceived as the other performer — an improvised performance between the body and its negotiation with the environment.