Competition Brief: 

To house 100, 000 people on a 1 km2 territory where they would live, work and play. The site is the Paya Lebar Military Airbase, where the land is slated for future redevelopment after the military relocates its airbase operation in 2030. The theme is ‘Everyone Contributes’. 

“I have long thought that all the major infrastructures, from sewage to electricity and broadband, should be covered by transparent walls and floors, so if you are waiting for the bus, you can actually see how the city all works and begin to get engaged. ” – Saskia Sassen

Learning from the Maker’s culture, this project blurs the distinction between the Resident and the Architect. It calls for the residents themselves to engage in a two-way conversation with their own environment. Fuelled by the domestication of technology and production, residents are constantly learning, experimenting, growing, testing and crafting their own living and working spaces. 

As technology becomes more commonplace (with the advent of 3D printing, Arduinos, laser-cutting etc.), it brings manufacturing out of its traditional factory context and into homes, and the distinction between living and working spaces is dissolved. Jobs are created and employment is localised. 

This creates a landscape of multiple realities where one might be studying algae walls while another might be tinkering microbial waste treatment for their homes; their realities diverse, yet part of the collaboration cloud. In The Collab-oratory, all the parts are moving and the city is constantly morphing as people make, do and learn. 

Submitted for the Vertical Cities Asia Competition and was awarded the Honourable Mention prize. 

Competition Brief: 

To house 100, 000 people on a 1 km2 territory where they would live, work and play. The site is the Paya Lebar Military Airbase, where the land is slated for future redevelopment after the military relocates its airbase operation in 2030. The theme is ‘Everyone Contributes’. 

“I have long thought that all the major infrastructures, from sewage to electricity and broadband, should be covered by transparent walls and floors, so if you are waiting for the bus, you can actually see how the city all works and begin to get engaged. ” – Saskia Sassen

Learning from the Maker’s culture, this project blurs the distinction between the Resident and the Architect. It calls for the residents themselves to engage in a two-way conversation with their own environment. Fuelled by the domestication of technology and production, residents are constantly learning, experimenting, growing, testing and crafting their own living and working spaces. 

As technology becomes more commonplace (with the advent of 3D printing, Arduinos, laser-cutting etc.), it brings manufacturing out of its traditional factory context and into homes, and the distinction between living and working spaces is dissolved. Jobs are created and employment is localised. 

This creates a landscape of multiple realities where one might be studying algae walls while another might be tinkering microbial waste treatment for their homes; their realities diverse, yet part of the collaboration cloud. In The Collab-oratory, all the parts are moving and the city is constantly morphing as people make, do and learn. 

Submitted for the Vertical Cities Asia Competition and was awarded the Honourable Mention prize.